Das Wetter und der Klimawandel

Beiträge mit Schlagwort ‘Meteosat’

Full Disk Earth on 27th May, 2012

On May 27th 2012 european weather satellite MeteoSat took a nice picture of full disk earth displaying some intersting weather action. Meteosat circles Earth in a geostationary orbit (36.000 km altitude) delivering daily current views frome same fixed position above surface of the planet.

Jetstream and dynamical weather systems: A band of cloud across Northern Atlantic (from Greenland to Scandinavia) indicates behaviour of jetstream, driven by gradient in air-temperature (and gradient in air pressure arising thereby, respectively) between polar regions and mid latitudes.

Jetstream is crucial to weather forecast:

Like the vortexes in a raging river high and low pressure systems – weather-determining in mid latitudes – arise from turbulences in jetstream and are moved by flow of jetstream after that.

Weather on 27th May, 2012, 16:00 UTC . Innertropical Convergence Zone, the deserts of Subtropical High Pressure Belt and the weather systems (cyclones and anticyclones) of the mid – latidudes are easily dercernable. Natural Color RGB images makes use of three solar channels: red, green and blue. In this color scheme vegetation appears greenish because of its large reflectance in the green beam channel compared to the red and blue beam channels. Water clouds with small droplets have large reflectance at all three channels and hence appear whitish, while snow and ice clouds appears cyan because ice strongly absorbs in red. Bare ground appears brown because of the larger reflectance in the red beam channel than at the blue one, and the ocean appears black because of the low reflectance in all three channels. Source: Meteosat, EUMETSAT

The two vortexes over middle Northern Atlantic, one of them in the southwest of British Isles, another one further westward, are cut-off  lows. They have separated from jetstream some time ago, triggered by a large blocking high pressure system widespread over parts of Northern, Western and Central Europe and German Sea. Blocking highs occur if the flow of  jetstream slows down or even breaks so that a moving high pressure systeme comes to a deadlock. The two Cut-off lows over middle Northern Atlantic are following a pathway southward blocking high.

Inside high pressure systems (anticyclones), spinning arount clockwise, air sinks and nearly all clouds decay, because water in the condensed form tends to evaporate into water vapor. Thus high pressure systems lead to fair weather at most times.

Inside low pressure systems (cyclones), spinning around counterclockwise, air rises and cools, so that water vapor condenses, forming clouds made of tiny water droplets or ice crystals. Latent heat (thermal energy of condensation) released thereby, powers cloud formation for her part by warming the rising air. Low pressure systems imply bad weather with rainfall an thunderstorms many a time. 

Tropical-subtropical Hadley-Circulation:  Away from almost cloud-free subtropical belt of high pressure systems air flows to equator going along surface. These tradewinds are turning westward due to Earth´s rotation. Throughout the region of equator there´s a buildup of low pressure, called Innertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Heated by the sun, equatorial air rises and cools, forcing whatever water vapor it holds to condense into clouds. The ascended air moves poleward, turning eastward by Earth´s rotation soon after. As moving poleward, air flow comes closer to the axis of earth’s rotation. That´s why it goes faster, often forming a subtropical jetstream that rotates more rapidly than the Earth itself. In addition air descends closing the circulation in this way. This so called Hadley-Circulation is breaking up in a row of cloud-rich convective cells around the whole planet Earth.

Jens Christian Heuer

Advertisements

A Satellite Picture explaining our Weather

The European weather satellite Meteosat, circles the Earth on a geostationary orbit (36.000 km altitude) providing daily current views of our planet. On this color infrared recording of  November 22th 2011, you can see some important phenomena of global weather patterns.  

Dynamical Weather Systems: Weather on earth-like planets is driven by temperature differences between equator and poles, caused by different sun´s irradiance. In mid – latitudes, where warm tropical and cool polar air masses encounter each other, gradient of temperature (and thereby gradient of pressure) is sufficient to generate a high altitude air current (called tropospheric polar jetstream) on both hemispheres, turning eastward under influence of earth’s rotation.

Breaking a critical speed limit, the jetstream forms Rossby waves with troughs and ridges(wave peaks). A lot of shear forces emerge. The waves break and roll up to vortices. These are the high pressure und low pressure systems, enabled to intermix the warm tropical and cool polar air masses.

The high pressure vortices (anticyclones) are spinning downward and clockwise (counterclockwise) on northern (southern) hemisphere, whereas the low pressure vortices (cyclones) are spinning upward and counterclockwise (clockwise) on northern (southern) hemisphere.

Weather at November 22th, 2011, 12:00 UTC . The ITCZ, the deserts in the Subtropical High Presure Belt and the Low Pressure Systems (Cyclones) of the mid – latidudes are easily dercernable. Natural Color RGB images makes use of three solar channels: red, green and blue. In this color scheme vegetation appears greenish because of its large reflectance in the green beam channel compared to the red and blue beam channels. Water clouds with small droplets have large reflectance at all three channels and hence appear whitish, while snow and ice clouds appears cyan because ice strongly absorbs in red. Bare ground appears brown because of the larger reflectance in the red beam channel than at the blue one, and the ocean appears black because of the low reflectance in all three channels. Source: Meteosat, EUMETSAT

Inside low pressure systems the air rises and cools, so that water vapor condenses, forming clouds made of tiny water droplets or ice crystals (bad weather). Latent heat (thermal energy of condensation) thereby released powers cloud formation on her part warming the rising air.

Inside high pressure systems the air sinks and clouds decay, because water in the condensed form tends to evaporate into water vapor (fair weather).

Cyclones derive their energy not only from the jetstream, but also from latent heat liberated during formation of clouds. In turn they transmitted back a portion of their energy to jetstream.

The pathways of cyclones are affected by the behaviour of the jetstream.But sometimes the high air current slow down or breaks actually, so that the cyclones are able to seperate from jetstream. These cut off lows move slowly and won’t exit a region until they are captured by a trough of a new jetstream, which meanwhile has usually formed.

Low Pressure Systeme (Cyclone) Source: Bjerknes (1922)

Tropical Hadley – Circulation: Away from this areas of high pressure the air masses move equatorially along the surface (tradewinds), where´s a buildup of low pressure (Innertropical Convergence Zone, ITCZ) : These tradewinds turn westward due to earth´s  rotation. Heated by the sun,  equatorial air rises and cools, forcing whatever water vapor it holds to condense into clouds. The ascended air moves poleward , but it is turned eastward by the earth´s rotation. As moving  polewards, the air current contracts closer to the axis of earth’s rotation. So it must spin faster, creating subtropical jetstreams that rotate more rapidly than the Earth itself..In parts however, the air descends in the belt of subtropical pressure, closing the air circulation. This so called Hadley-Circulation.partions in a row of convective cells around the whole planet.

Stratosphere and Polar Vortex: The stratosphere is the next layer of atmosphere above the troposphere, in which most weather processes play. The stratosphere contains little water vapor, but larger quantities of ozone, protecting life by absorption of dangerous solar ultraviolet radiation. Therefore the stratosphere is much warmer than the upper troposphere.

If the stratosphere over the poles is cold enough during the polar night, a polar vortex forms due to a sufficient gradient of temperature to build up an eastward stratospheric jetstream, which is a propulsion engine of tropospheric polar jetstream (see above).

A strong polar vortex favors a poleward, zonal circulation (along the lines of latitude), a weak, often divided polar vortex, however, favors a meridional circulation with pronounced troughs and ridges (along the lines of longitude).

Jens Christian Heuer

Ein Satellitenbild erklärt das Wetter

Der europäische Wettersatellit Meteosat, der die Erde auf einer geostationären Bahn in rund 36.000 km Höhe umkreist liefert täglich aktuelle Ansichten unseres Planeten. Auf dieser eingefärbten Infrarotaufnahme vom 06. Juni 2009 lassen sich die wichtigen Erscheinungen des globalen Wettergeschehens gut erkennen.

 Infrarotaufnahmen bilden die unsichtbare Wärmestrahlung ab, die vom Land, den Wasserflächen und den Wolken ausgeht. Warme Objekte erscheinen dunkel, kalte Objekte dagegen hell. Aus den Helligkeiten der Objekte ist somit ein direkter Rückschluß auf deren Temperatur möglich. Infrarotbilder gelingen auch in der Dunkelheit der Nacht, denn im Gegensatz zum sichtbaren Licht ist die Wärmestrahlung immer vorhanden. Quellwolken, die sich bis in große Höhen auftürmen sind wegen der mit der Höhe abnehmenden Lufttemperatur an ihrer Oberseite relativ kalt und erscheinen daher hell. Dasselbe gilt für die nur in großer Höhe entstehenden Eiswolken. Niedrige Wolken sind dagegen schon fast genauso warm wie die Erdoberfläche darunter und erscheinen somit ähnlich dunkel. Diese Aufnahme ist zusätzlich noch eingefärbt (RGB-Komposit), wodurch sich die verschiedenen Luftmassen gut unterscheiden lassen.

Wetterlage am 06. Juni 2009 Infrarot-Komposit Meteosat; grün = tropische Warmluft, blau = polare Kaltluft, weiss = hohe Wolken, ockergelb = mittelhohe Wolken, rot = absinkende Luftmassen in der Stratosphäre zeigen Tiefdruckgebiete an (Durch Divergenzen in der Höhenströmung werden nicht nur Luftmassen von unten gehoben, sondern auch von oben angesaugt; Ausbildung einer Tropopausenfalte und Absinken der darüber befindlichen stratosphärischen Luft). Die ITCZ zeigt sich in der Äquatorregion als Wolkenband mit zahlreichen hochreichenden Gewitterzellen (hellgelbe Wolken). Gut zu erkennen sind auch die girlandenartig aufgereihten dynamischen Tiefdruckwirbel in den mittleren Breiten der Nordhalbkugel. Quelle: EUMETSAT

Das Satellitenbild zeigt sehr schön die globale Luftzirkulation der Erde und die damit einhergehenden Wettererscheinungen, welche für einen Temperaturausgleich zwischen den von der Sonne unterschiedlich stark beschienenen Regionen des Planeten sorgen. Die Pole bekommen im Vergleich zur Äquatorregion (Tropen) deutlich weniger Sonnenenergie ab. Die Folge ist ein Temperaturgefälle (Temperaturgradient) von der Äquatorregion zu den Polen auf beiden Erdhalbkugeln.

Die mittleren Breiten: Sowohl auf der Nord- als auch auf der Südhalbkugel treffen tropische Warmluft und polare Kaltluft  jeweils in den mittleren Breiten aufeinander. Da warme Luft sich (vertikal) mehr ausdehnt als kalte Luft, erzeugt das Temperaturgefälle zwischen beiden Luftmassen auch ein Druckgefälle, das mit wachsender Höhe zunimmt. Daraus resultieren über beiden Erdhalbkugeln polwärts gerichtete Winde, die unter dem Einfluß der Erdrotation  zu Westwinden abgelenkt werden. In grösserer Höhe (obere Troposphäre) bilden sich wegen des dort sehr hohen Druckgradienten Starkwindbänder, die  Jetstreams. Aus Turbulenzen im Jetstream entwickeln sich (unter der Einwirkung der Erdrotation) aufwärtsgerichtete dynamische Tiefdruckwirbel (Cyclonen) und abwärtsgerichtete dynamische Hochdruckwirbel (Anticyclonen). Innerhalb der Cyclonen wird die Luft gehoben und kühlt dabei ab, so dass sich bei ausreichender Luftfeuchtigkeit viele Wolken bilden können (Schlechtwetter). Bei den Anticyclonen verhält es sich genau umgekehrt (Schönwetter). Beide Druckgebilde verwirbeln tropische Warmluft und polare Kaltluft miteinander. Die Cyclonen bewegen sich mit der Höhenströmung in Richtung Osten und sorgen unter ihren Zugbahnen (zusammen mit Zwischenhochs) für ein mildes, aber auch wechselhaftes Wetter.

Es ist so ähnlich wie bei einem Fluss mit Stromschnellen: Wenn das Gefälle zunimmt oder Felsblöcke  das Flußbett verengen, dann bilden sich Wirbel, welche mit der Strömung davongetragen werden. Dem Gefälle des Flusses entspricht beim Jetstream das Temperatur- bzw. Druckgefälle zwischen tropischer Warmluft und polarer Kaltluft. Die Rolle der Felsblöcke spielen hohe Gebirge, welche die Höhenströmung stören.

Tiefdruckwirbel (Cyclonen): Durch die vom Tiefdruckzentrum ausgehende Drehbewegung stösst warme Luft polwärts gegen die Kaltluft vor (Warmfront), und im Gegenzug stösst kalte Luft äquatorwärts gegen die Warmluft vor (Kaltfront). An der Warmfront, wo die warme Luft langsam über die kältere Luft nach oben gleitet, bildet sich eine Schichtbewölkung (Stratus) Häufig regnet es über längere Zeit (Landregen). In größeren Höhen, wo es noch kälter ist, bilden sich Eiswolken (Cirrus). Die Kaltfront und die dahinter befindliche Kaltluft bewegen sich wesentlich schneller als die vorauseilende Warmluft, da letztere aufgrund ihrer Aufstiegstendenz eine schwächer ausgeprägte Vorwärtsbewegung hat. Die Warmluft wird so nach und nach von der sie einholenden Kaltluft durchdrungen und erfährt dabei, da sie leichter ist, einen starken Auftrieb (labile Luftschichtung). Durch Konvektion bildet sich eine ausgeprägte Quellbewölkung. Bei kräftigen Winden kommt es zu heftigen Regenfällen, oft auch zu Gewittern mit Hagel. Der Warmluftsektor wird nach und nach zusammengeschoben. Warm- und Kaltfront vereinigen sich zu einer Mischfront (Okklusion) bis schließlich der Warmluftsektor vollkommen verschwunden ist. Später löst sich das Tief dann ganz auf. Die durchschnittliche Lebensdauer dynamischer Tiefdruckwirbel liegt bei knapp einer Woche. An den Kaltfronten älterer Tiefdruckgebiete können kleine Wellenstörungen auftreten und die Bildung weiterer dynamischer Tiefdruckgebiete (Randtiefs, Tochtertiefs) auslösen. Quelle: Geo Special Nr. 2 Wetter 1982

Cyclonen beziehen ihre Energie nicht nur aus den sie hervorbringenden Jetstreams, sondern auch aus der latenten Wärme (Kondensationswärme), die bei der Wolkenbildung  frei wird. Die Cyclonen ihrerseits übertragen einen Teil ihrer Energie  wiederum an ihren Jetstream.

Cyclonen und Anticyclonen erzeugen Schwingungen innerhalb der Jetstreams. Bei Überschreiten einer kritischen Windgeschwindigkeit beginnt der Jetstream dann zu mäandern und bildet Rossby-Wellen aus. In den cyclonalen Wellentälern (Höhentrögen) wird polare Kaltluft äquatorwärts, in den anticyclonalen Wellenbergen (Hochkeilen, Rücken) tropische Warmluft polwärts transportiert (meridionaler Transport). Bei einem stark mäandernden Jetstream bricht die Höhenströmung teilweise zusammen, so daß sich cyclonale und anticyclonale Wirbel abspalten können (Cut Off). Anschließend erneuert sich weiter polwärts die Höhenströmung wieder.

Jetstream mit Höhentrögen, Hochkeilen und dem Cut Off eines Kaltlufttropfens Quelle: http://www.britannica.com/

Die cyclonalen Wirbel (Kaltlufttropfen, kalte Höhentiefs) bewegen sich (langsam) mit den jeweils vorherrschenden Winden und bringen schlechtes Wetter. Die anticyclonalen Wirbel bleiben oft stationär und zwingen als blockierende Hochdruckgebiete die von Westen herannahenden dynamischen Tiefdruckgebiete zu oft großen Umwegen. In ihrem Einflußbereich herrscht sonniges Wetter bei zumeist wolkenfreiem Himmel. Nachts kann es  wegen der fehlenden Wolken allerdings auch empfindlich kalt werden. Bei ausreichender Luftfeuchtigkeit bilden sich dann bodennahe Nebel.

Die Pole: Über den Polen der Erde bilden sich in der Stratosphäre abwärtsgerichtete, kalte Tiefdruckwirbel, welche bis in die mittlere Troposphäre hinabreichen, die Polarwirbel.

Die Stratosphäre ist die nächsthöhere Atmosphärenschicht oberhalb der Troposphäre, wo sich das meiste Wettergeschehen abspielt. In der Stratosphäre gehtes hingegen vergleichsweise ruhig zu. Sie enthält nur wenig Wasserdampf, dafür aber größere Mengen Ozon, das die für das Leben gefährlichen Anteile der von der Sonne eintreffenden Ultraviolettstrahlung absorbiert. Dadurch wird die Stratosphäre deutlich wärmer als die obere Troposphäre.

Ein Polarwirbel kann sich nur bilden, wenn die Stratosphäre über den Polen kalt genug ist. Während der Polarnacht nimmt der jeweilige Polarwirbel an Stärke zu. Dann ist der stratosphärische Temperaturgradient besonders hoch und treibt dementsprechend den Stratosphärenjetstream an, gleichzeitig der äussere Rand des Polarwirbels.

Die Tropen: Auf beiden Erdhalbkugeln bildet eine Reihe dynamischer Hochdruckwirbel (Anticyclonen) jeweils einen subtropischen Hochdruckgürtel, welche wegen der zumeist fehlenden Wolken auf Satellitenbildern gut auszumachen sind  (Wüstenklima der Subtropen). Im Bereich der Innertropischen Konvergenzzone (ITCZ) strömen die warmen Luftmassen aus den Subtropenhochs von Nord- und Südhalbkugel zusammen (Konvergenz) und werden gehoben. Wegen der hohen Luftfeuchtigkeit in den Tropen bilden sich hier auffällig viele Wolken (tropisch feuchtes Klima mit häufigen und heftigen Gewittern). Die über der ITCZ gehobenen Luftmassen erreichen die Subtropenhochs, um dort wieder abzusinken. ITCZ und Subtropenhochs sind somit (auf beiden Erdhalbkugeln) über eine Reihe von Konvektionszellen miteinander verbunden, die Hadley-Zellen.

Über den Subtropen entwickelt sich unter dem Einfluss der Erdrotation  eine von Westen nach Osten gerichtete Höhenströmung, die bei ausreichender Energiezufuhr in Form von latenter Wärme aus den Hadley-Zellen einen Subtropenjetstream ausbildet.

Jens Christian Heuer

Schlagwörter-Wolke